The Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest

The front of the Museum of Fine Arts

The Museum of Fine Arts ©Dan Lundberg/Flick

The unparalleled collection of the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest embraces ancient culture and includes each art period and style in Europe. It has one of the largest graphic collection in Europe. The Eclectic building of the museum located in the Heroes’ Square and finished in 1906 also houses large-scale temporary exhibitions.

The Museum of Fine Arts is opened from Tuesday to Sunday from 10 am until 17 pm, but on Thursdays usually awaits its vistors with Jazz Salon, guided tours and other special events until 10 p.m.

 

The Museum of Fine Arts

The Museum of Fine Arts ©Roller Coaster Philosophy/Flick

Permanent exhibitions

The permanent exhibitions of the museum houses the collection of the Old Picture Gallery with pictures from the 12th-18th century including the works of Bellini, Giorgione, Raphael, Correggio, Leonardo da Vinci, Dürer, Brueghel, Bernard van Orley, Rubens, Frans Hals and the Spanish El Greco, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya.

The Egyptian collection includes shrine relieves from the Ptolemy period, and artifacts from the Nirqi Abdallah excavations.

The Museum of Fine Arts

The Museum of Fine Arts ©alex.ch/Flick

The Antique Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts presents about 1000 Greco-Roman Etruscan work, including the famous marble relief work dispaying the decisive battle of Actium.

The art collection of the 19th-20th century includes art paintings of the French Impressionism and Post-Impressionism and other internationally famous abstract and contemporary works besides of the Italian and Baroque pictures.

Art collection of the Museum of Fine Arts

Art collection of the Museum of Fine Arts ©korom/Flick

The building of the museum

The building of the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest was designed by Albert Schickedanz and Fülöp Herzog. The Eclectic building was finished in 1906.

The original paintings are found in the rooms of the firs floor. The universal history of sculpture could only be presented by plaster copies. These life-size copies of the statues were placed in the Doric, Ionic, Roman, Renaissance and Baroque halls on the ground floor.

While the collection of the original masterpieces was growing, the plaster sculptures gradually left the Museum of Fine Arts. Today we can see only the copy of the sculptures of the Olympic Zeus Temple on the spandrels of the museum.

The front of the Museum of Fine Arts

The front of the Museum of Fine Arts ©Dan Lundberg/Flick

In the rooms of the ground floor you will also find the Antique collection, the art works from the 19th century, the Renaissance hall, the Graphic hall and the Marble and Baroque Hall.

During the reconstruction of the museum some deep ground-floor rooms were also added to the building that hosts the Egyptian collection, the painting and sculpture collection of the 20th century and the hall under the Doric courtyard periodic expositions await us.

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